Single-Tasking

The ability to multitask is something most of us claim to have and rely heavily on. Multitasking has become associated with efficiency and intelligence, however, very few of us are actually “good” at it. When carrying out multiple tasks, rather than focusing simultaneously on everything, our brain toggles our focus back and forth between each task. This constant shifting of focus ends up leaving us overwhelmed and drained, reducing our productivity, and stressing us out.

Single-tasking, or focusing on one task at a time, is a smarter (more efficient) way of being productive. By maintaining complete focus on one task, you eliminate the time it takes for your brain to shift focus, meaning you’ll get things done quicker. Not only does it save you time but dedicating 100% of your focus to each task will increase your performance and reduce your stress.

Our body reflects our mind, meaning if we’re overwhelmed and stressed by our thoughts, our bodies will develop the same stress and tension. Not only does single-tasking ease your mind and make you more productive, but it also prevents your tasks and responsibilities from affecting your well-being.

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To make tackling your to-do list more productive and manageable, practice these single-tasking strategies:

  • Start small. Giving yourself 3 easy tasks is a great way to get yourself feeling accomplished and motivated to do more. Take pride in each task you complete and gradually work your way up to completing more.

  • Break down larger tasks. This makes larger, stressful tasks seem more realistic by creating a clear step-by-step plan. This is also a great way to prevent procrastination.

  • Schedule time for each task. Work in bursts and take a break in between each task. Rotating the tasks you work on is a great way to tackle multiple things in one day, while still dedicating yourself to one task at a time.

  • Be patient and realistic. Forming a new habit isn’t easy, and it takes time and consistency. Take it day by day and strive for progress, not perfection.

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Single-tasking may seem simpler than multi-tasking, however, it requires practice and training since multi-tasking has become habitual. Although the process of changing our habits can be discouraging, the benefits you’ll receive in the end far outweigh the challenge. If at any point you find yourself needing encouragement, we recommend scheduling time with us at Serenity, where we’ll handle the physical stress so that you can focus on your mental stress.

Vance Joy - Take Your Time